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January

In the eight months leading up to Metroid's 25th anniversary, we're featuring the eight oldest Metroid games each month from newest to oldest, culminating with the original Metroid game in August!

Metroid Prime Pinball cover

Metroid Prime Pinball boxart

Metroid Prime Pinball (メトロイドプライムピンボール, Metoroido Puraimu Pinbōru) is a pinball-themed game in the Metroid series. The game uses the graphical style and various story elements from Metroid Prime. It was developed by Fuse Games, the developers of Mario Pinball Land for the Game Boy Advance. The game has received generally favorable reviews, holding a 79% at Metacritic and an 82% at Game Rankings. It comes bundled with the Nintendo DS Rumble Pak. (continue reading)

February

In the eight months leading up to Metroid's 25th anniversary, we're featuring the eight oldest Metroid games each month from newest to oldest, culminating with the original Metroid game in August!

Metroidprime2echoes

Metroid Prime 2: Echoes box art.

Metroid Prime 2: Echoes (メトロイドプライム2: ダークエコーズ, Metoroido Puraimu 2: Dāku Ekōzu - Metroid Prime 2: Dark Echoes in Japan and Korea) is the second Prime game in the Prime trilogy. It is a direct sequel to Metroid Prime, although chronologically, it occurs after Metroid Prime Hunters. It was developed by Retro Studios and published by Nintendo for the Nintendo GameCube. It is the first Metroid game to have a multiplayer feature. (continue reading)

March

In the eight months leading up to Metroid's 25th anniversary, we're featuring the eight oldest Metroid games each month from newest to oldest, culminating with the original Metroid game in August!

MetroidPrimebox

Metroid Prime's box art.

Metroid Prime (メトロイドプライム, Metoroido Puraimu) is the first 3D Metroid game released on November 15, 2002. It was developed by Nintendo-owned Retro Studios and published by Nintendo for the Nintendo GameCube. It is officially classified by Nintendo as a first-person adventure, rather than a first-person shooter, due to the large exploration component to the game. It was also the first Metroid game to be released since Super Metroid, which was released nearly eight years earlier, though this only applies to North America as in all other markets, it was released after Metroid Fusion. Metroid Prime was the first of the four part Prime storyline, which takes place between the original Metroid and Metroid II: Return of Samus. This is due to the fact that the titular Metroid creatures were exterminated in the latter, and Prime contains Metroids as minor creatures. The title was later bundled with the GameCube in 2004. Like the rest of the series, Metroid Prime has a science fiction setting, once again allowing the player to control the Bounty Hunter Samus Aran. The story follows Samus battling the Space Pirates and their biological experiments on planet Tallon IV. (continue reading)

April

In the eight months leading up to Metroid's 25th anniversary, we're featuring the eight oldest Metroid games each month from newest to oldest, culminating with the original Metroid game in August!

Metroid Zero Mission - North American Cover

North American Metroid: Zero Mission box art

Metroid: Zero Mission (メトロイドゼロミッション, Metoroido Zero Misshon) is a remake of Metroid, making it chronologically the first game in the Metroid series and replacing Metroid in the canon. It was designed to "retell the story of Samus Aran's original mission". Zero Mission was developed by Nintendo's internal team, Nintendo Research & Development 1, under the direction of Yoshio Sakamoto. Zero Mission features a slightly different plot than Metroid with the addition of new areas. (continue reading)

May

In the eight months leading up to Metroid's 25th anniversary, we're featuring the eight oldest Metroid games each month from newest to oldest, culminating with the original Metroid game in August!

Metroid Fusion box art

Metroid Fusion box art

Metroid Fusion (also known as Metroid 4 (メトロイドフュージョン, Metoroido Fyūjon, and referred to as Metroid IV during production) is currently the last game chronologically in the Metroid series. It is also the first Metroid game released on the Game Boy Advance. It, along with Metroid Prime, is the first Metroid game released in eight years since Super Metroid in 1994. It occurs after the sequel, Metroid: Other M. (continue reading)

June

Bioweapon Research Center Terminal 2

Samus and MB in the Bioweapon Research Center.

The Bioweapon Research Center is a Galactic Federation base connected to the Biosphere in Metroid: Other M. Samus Aran arrives here while tracking the Deleter and meets MB, pretending to be Madeline Bergman; MB proceeds to reveal that two of the threats that were previously wiped out from the galaxy, Metroids and Ridley, were cloned using remnants of their DNA located on Samus' Power Suit, which were extracted from her soon after her last mission on Zebes. Later, Adam orders Samus to find a survivor in Room MW, which turns out to be the real Madeline Bergman. Samus destroys a Queen Metroid and then pursues the escaping Madeline.

Continue reading...

July

Cyborg Zebesian

Cyborg Zebesians, examples of Galactic Federation Bioweapons.

"Bioweapon" is a term used to describe a living thing that was captured or created for the purpose of use in battle or warfare against its will (if sentient). Bioweapons are often augmented, either through cybernetic enhancement or as a result of genetic alteration. According to Samus Aran and Adam Malkovich, the use of bioweapons is "strictly prohibited" and "illegal", at least within the Galactic Federation.

In its later days, the Galactic Federation had a history of using bioweapons, initially gathering species from various planets to create a special-forces unit modeled after the Space Pirate Zebesians on the Bottle Ship. This eventually led to the creation of Metroids, which were cloned to be used as weapons from fragments of DNA found on Samus Aran's Power Suit after her mission on planet Zebes. However, these experiments were done in secret, and as such was not supported by the majority of the Federation, but rather a "small group" that used a report written by Adam Malkovich as the basis for their operations.

August

Metroidone

Metroid (メトロイド, Metoroido) is the first game in the Metroid series. It was released first for the Famicom Disk System on August 6, 1986, and later for the Nintendo Entertainment System in August 1987 in North America and in Europe on January 15, 1988. The game was produced by Gunpei Yokoi and was directed by Yoshio Sakamoto, with the music by Hirokazu Tanaka. The game was known for its eerie sci-fi flavor. Metroid would be remade for the Game Boy Advance under the title Metroid: Zero Mission, with a new plot and areas added to the game, with the original game being unlockable. The game was also ported onto a cartridge in the Classic NES Series. Metroid was later released on the Wii's Virtual Console on August 13, 2007. (continue reading)

September

Metroid2 boxart

Metroid II: Return of Samus (メトロイドII RETURN OF SAMUS, Metoroido Tsū Ritān Obu Samusu) is the sequel to Metroid, the second game in the Metroid series, and the only one to appear on the Game Boy. It is about Samus Aran's mission to exterminate the Metroids on their home planet, SR388. Although it is the second release in the series, chronologically it takes place after Metroid Prime 3: Corruption and before Super Metroid. (continue reading)

October

Phantoon

Phantoon official artwork for Super Metroid

Phantoon is an ethereal, super-natural, genderless spectre that is both intangible and/or invulnerable to any form of attack, except for its single eye. It is this eye that, when open, serves as its connection to the material world and can be damaged. From four meters tall, to ten times as large as Samus' ship, Phantoon resembles a giant squid with a single eye inside a large mouth. Samus has fought the creature twice, once in the Wrecked Ship on Zebes, and once on the Bottle Ship. (continue reading)

November

Morphball1

The Morph Ball

One of the most prominent, integral, and representative items of the Metroid games, the Morph Ball (モーフボール, Mōfu Bōru) sometimes called the Morphing Ball, or the "Maru Mari," is the Alt-Form of Samus Aran that turns her into a sphere that is almost 1 meter in diameter. It allows her to explore small tunnels which usually lead to rooms with crucial items in them.

The Morph Ball, like many other components of Samus's Power Suit, is modular. The Morph Ball can receive upgrades such as Bombs, the Boost Ball, the Spider Ball, and Power Bombs.

(continue reading)

December

NPC! MP Screen 20

The Phendrana Shorelines, the first large room of the Phendrana Drifts

Phendrana Drifts (known as Ice Valley in the Japanese release) is an area on Tallon IV, explored by Samus in Metroid Prime. It is the fourth area that Samus must explore in the game. Located at the southwestern edge of the explorable Tallon IV areas, the Phendrana Drifts are snowy and icy, with some parts filled with water. It is also the location of a Space Pirate research lab. The Phendrana Drifts are home to two bosses, an adult Sheegoth and Thardus.

(continue reading)

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